General information

IMO:
9005429
MMSI:
372415000
Callsign:
HP7329
Width:
32.0 m
Length:
201.0 m
Deadweight:
Gross tonnage:
TEU:
Liquid Capacity:
Year of build:
Class:
AIS type:
Cargo Ship
Ship type:
Flag:
Panama
Manager:
Builder:
Owner:
Operator:
Insurer:

Course/Position

Position:
Navigational status:
Moored
Course:
39.2° / 0.0
Heading:
41.0° / 0.0
Speed:
Max speed:
Status:
moored
Location:
Vila do Conde (Vila do Conde Port)
Area:
Brazil
Last seen:
21 min ago
Source:
T-AIS
Destination:
ETA:
Max Draught:
Last drought:
Last update:
42 min ago
Source:
T-AIS
Calculated ETA:

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Latest ports

Port
Arrival
Departure
Duration
2018-11-16
2018-11-17
12h 23m
2018-10-17
2018-10-18
1d 9h 56m
2018-09-28
2018-10-07
8d 11h 22m
2018-09-24
2018-09-28
3d 22h 40m
2018-09-03
2018-09-11
7d 10h 35m
Spain
2018-08-05
2018-08-06
1d 3h 2m
Turkey
2018-07-28
2018-08-01
4d 13h 45m
Brazil
2018-07-08
2018-07-14
5d 23h 22m
Spain
2018-06-14
2018-06-15
1d 9h 8m
Turkey
2018-06-01
2018-06-06
5d 10h 25m
Note: All times are in UTC

Latest news

Livestock Carrier Escapes Brazil’s Live Animal Export Ban

Tue Feb 06 08:09:36 CET 2018 arnekiel

(Reuters) – A Brazilian federal court late on Sunday lifted an injunction blocking the shipment of around 25,000 cattle from the port of Santos, allowing for the individual cargo to leave port but leaving in place a broader ban on shipments of live animals. The initial injunction had been granted on behalf of an animal rights group known as Fórum Nacional de Proteção e Defesa Animal, which had argued that long-distance shipping practices amount to animal cruelty, according to the court ruling. The shipment has now left port and is headed to Turkey, according to a spokesman for Minerva SA, the Brazilian meatpacker that sold the animals to a client in that country. The journey generally takes 16 days. Shipment of live animals from Brazil remains forbidden after a lower court imposed an injunction on Friday. Originally 27,000 head were supposed to be shipped on Feb. 1, but the injunction that prevented the ship’s departure also led to some of the animals not being loaded onto the Panamanian livestock vessel NADA - http://gcaptain.com/livestock-carrier-escapes-brazils-live-animal-export-ban/

Nada livestock carrier arrives in Mexico after controversy in Timaru

Mon Jun 29 14:09:33 CEST 2015 arnekiel

The livestock carrier Nada has reached Mexico, according to vessel tracking data. The ship left the Port of Timaru on June 12 under a cloud of controversy. Its shipment of 50,000 sheep and 3000 cattle had animal activists protesting the practice of shipping large numbers of live animals, and questioned whether they were meant for breeding or slaughter. Marine Traffic indicates the ship is currently berthed in the port of Mazatlan, in the province of Durango. Peter Walsh and Associates director Peter Walsh, who procured the animals, understood the State of Mexico was taking a number and the sheep were going to at least two different states in Mexico. He discounted claims the animals would be slaughtered. "It is my understanding they are worth $300 at the other end so they are not going to kill them. Once the sheep arrive in Mexico and are unloaded the importer becomes responsible for their welfare."

50,000 sheep leave Timaru port

Thu Jun 11 07:34:38 CEST 2015 arnekiel

A ship carrying 50,000 live sheep and 3000 live cattle to Mexico has left Timaru "without a hitch", the port says. PrimePort chief executive Phil Melhopt says loading wrapped up around 9am and the ship left the port around 11:40am. "We haven't done a shipment of sheep here for quite some time but we've had a lot of experience doing it," he says. The shipment is being sent for breeding purposes following a drought in Mexico and to ease the effects of a current drought in New Zealand. However it has met strong opposition from the animal advocacy group SAFE who believes the animals could serious suffer during the two week ocean trip. Mr Key says he thinks those concerns have been over-stated. "We've been doing it under successive governments for a long time," he said. "In 2007, 35,000 sheep were sent to Mexico for breeding and they were totally satisfactory, the sheep were used for the purpose that was intended." The Prime Minister is also promising the sheep won’t be going over for slaughter. "They're going for breeding, they're very expensive sheep to do anything else with," he said. "If you wanted to buy sheep for slaughter, you wouldn't pay a premium price for them." A Ministry for Primary Industries spokesperson confirmed three New Zealand handlers would travel on the ship and help with the deportation in Mexico. A Mexican vet is also on board. Read more: http://www.3news.co.nz/nznews/50000-sheep-leave-timaru-port-2015061115#ixzz3cjFs3dm9

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