General information

IMO:
9697428
MMSI:
563004200
Callsign:
9V5283
Width:
48.0 m
Length:
300.0 m
Deadweight:
Gross tonnage:
TEU:
Liquid Capacity:
Year of build:
Class:
AIS type:
Cargo Ship
Ship type:
Flag:
Singapore
Builder:
Owner:
Operator:
Insurer:

Course/Position

Position:
Navigational status:
Moored
Course:
304.8° / 4.0
Heading:
129.0° / 4.0
Speed:
Max speed:
Status:
moving
Area:
Chesapeake Bay
Last seen:
2024-05-20
4 min ago
Source:
T-AIS
Destination:
ETA:
Summer draft:
Current draft:
Last update:
6 min ago
Source:
T-AIS
Calculated ETA:

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Latest ports

Port
Arrival
Departure
Duration
2024-05-20
4h 58m
2024-03-26
2024-05-20
55d 5h 47m
2024-03-23
2024-03-26
2d 10h 35m
2024-03-22
2024-03-23
19h 52m
2024-03-19
2024-03-21
1d 20h 13m
2024-03-13
2024-03-13
2h 7m
2024-03-13
2024-03-13
1h 43m
2024-03-13
2024-03-13
2h 34m
2024-02-20
2024-02-21
1d 15h 9m
2024-02-15
2024-02-16
17h 19m
Note: All times are in UTC

Latest Waypoints

Waypoints
Time
Direction
Colon Approach
2024-03-13
Leave
Cololi Locks
2024-03-13
Leave
Puente de las Americas
2024-03-13
Leave
Balboa Approach
2024-03-13
Leave
Kreta
2024-03-06
Leave
Kukup Island
2024-01-28
Leave
Malacca Straits - Penang Island
2024-01-27
Leave
Note: All times are in UTC

Latest news

Efforts to remove Dali have commenced

Mon May 20 12:12:57 CEST 2024 Timsen

On May 21 efforts were started to remooved the 'Dali' at around 05:00 a.m. when the tide was at its peak.Between eight and 12 million tons of steel has been removed from the ship before. Divers will be making last-minute inspections below the waterline and then tugs will attempt to ease the vessel from its position, before taking the 'Dali' to the Seagirt Marine Terminal, which is approximately 2.5 miles upriver.

Evaluation of Dali continued

Fri May 17 11:41:23 CEST 2024 Timsen

Unified Command officials continued to evaluate the 'Dali' on May 16 in preparation for refloating the vessel and clearing the federal channel. They have evaluated sonar and lidar imagery but are awaiting results from a dive survey before proceeding with the plans to move the 'Dali' to the Seagirt Marine Terminal in the Port of Baltimore. This diver inspection was a necessary and vital step in the complicated process of reopening the Fort McHenry Federal Channel in a manner that mitigates risk to the vessel once it’s carefully refloated and moved from its current position. To permit safe diver access to the Patapsco riverbed next to the vessel, Unified Command cranes must first remove submerged and unstable wreckage from the controlled demolition. Safety also dictated the securing or removal of severely damaged containers and overhanging wreckage from the initial bridge collapse onto the deck of the 'Dali'. This process was already underway and should be complete in the days ahead. During the complex operation of refloating the 'Dali', the Unified Command will continue removing wreckage in the central part of the Fort McHenry Federal Channel. More than 365 vessels have transited the four Port of Baltimore temporary alternate channels. These transits for commercial and recreational vessels will continue during the ongoing process to refloat the M/V Dali and salvage operation to clear the federal channel. Nearly 50% of the 700-foot-wide Fort McHenry Federal Channel had already been cleared to an operational depth of 48 feet before the controlled demolition. The federal channel is expected to be fully capable of supporting all commercial vessels in and out of the Port of Baltimore to a minimum operational depth of 50 feet in the weeks ahead. The current 2,000-yard safety zone around the Francis Scott Key Bridge remains in effect and is intended to protect personnel, vessels, and the marine environment. No vessel or person will be permitted to enter the safety zone without obtaining permission from the COTP or a designated representative.

Crew remains confined on board - Investigation into blackouts continued

Thu May 16 10:34:41 CEST 2024 Timsen

Seven weeks after the allision with the Francis Scott Key bridge in Baltomore, the crew of the 'Dali' is still trapped on the ship. Since the accident, the crew, comprising of 20 Indians and one Sri Lankan national, has been unable to disembark due to visa restrictions, lack of land passes and investigations by the FBI and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). The living conditions are harsh on board. While meals and packages are brought to them, but morale declines. During the first weeks of the investigation, the FBI confiscated their cell phones, leaving them virtually without communication with the outside world. They were then given SIM cards and temporary mobile phones without data. In a statement on May 11, two seafarers' unions called for their phones to be promptly returned, stressing that the loss of communication with family members causes considerable hardship for crew members. According to the Synergy Marine, the 'Dali's management company based in Singapore, the crew was resisting well. “All their needs were met to the best of their ability. For example, shipments of Indian meals were delivered on board to relieve the pressure on the cooks. Hindu priests also visited them. Once the ship has been docked, it was estimated that the sailors will only be able to set foot on land in small groups, with heavy restrictions on their movements. The 'Dali' experienced two blackouts while moored in the Port of Baltimore a day before its allision with the Francis Scott Key Bridge, and efforts to resolve those blackouts may have impacted the ship’s operations, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said in a congressional hearing on May 15. After the two in-port blackouts on March 25, the ship’s crew switched to a different transformer and set of breakers from those that had been in use for several months, according to NTSB Chair Jennifer Homendy. That may have impacted the ship’s operations when it left the port a day later. Switching breakers is not unusual but may have affected operations the very next day. The comments, which add further context to the focus of the NTSB investigation, came during a hearing for the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure reviewing and analyzing the federal response to the accident. On May 14, the NTSB had released a 24-page preliminary report detailing investigators’ early factual findings. The report found the 'Dali' was just three ships’ lengths from the bridge when it suffered a pair of electrical failures, which caused several pumps required for the ship’s propeller and rudder to stop working. The emergency generator activated but was not configured to power the ship. The NTSB report found that the Dali had experienced two blackouts a day earlier while still moored in the port. The NTSB is still investigating the electrical configuration following the first in-port blackout and potential impacts on the events during the accident voyage. The NTSB has been working closely with Hyundai, which manufactures the ship equipment, to try to replicate some of the electrical problems of that day and understand better what happened.

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Distance travelled

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Ship master data