General information

IMO:
9769128
MMSI:
266436000
Callsign:
SCDL
Width:
18.0 m
Length:
100.0 m
Deadweight:
Gross tonnage:
TEU:
Liquid Capacity:
Year of build:
Class:
AIS type:
Tankship
Ship type:
Flag:
Sweden
Manager:
Builder:
Owner:
Operator:
Insurer:

Course/Position

Position:
Navigational status:
Anchored
Course:
166.8° / 127.0
Heading:
272.0° / 127.0
Speed:
Max speed:
Status:
anchorage
Area:
Kattegat
Last seen:
2019-07-21
2 min ago
Source:
T-AIS
Destination:
ETA:
Max Draught:
Last drought:
Last update:
7 min ago
Source:
T-AIS
Calculated ETA:

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Latest ports

Port
Arrival
Departure
Duration
2019-07-21
2019-07-21
3h 36m
2019-07-19
2019-07-19
2h 58m
2019-07-14
2019-07-16
1d 23h 4m
2019-07-10
2019-07-11
17h 24m
2019-07-06
2019-07-07
12h 50m
2019-07-03
2019-07-05
1d 16h 35m
2019-06-30
2019-07-01
21h 10m
2019-06-28
2019-06-28
11h 1m
2019-06-26
2019-06-26
10h 38m
2019-06-19
2019-06-22
2d 13h 17m
Note: All times are in UTC

Latest Waypoints

Waypoints
Time
Direction
Skagen
2019-07-17
Enter
Skagen
2019-07-07
Enter
Skagen
2019-07-07
Leave
Skagen
2019-07-07
Enter
Skagen
2019-07-05
Leave
Den Helder
2019-06-26
Enter
Hook of Holland
2019-06-26
Leave
Note: All times are in UTC

Latest news

Gasum LNG bunker vessel Coralius reaches 100 bunkerings milestone

Mon Mar 04 10:07:33 CET 2019 arnekiel

Gasum’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) bunker vessel, Coralius, made its 100th bunkering on Feb21. Coralius is operating on behalf of Gasum (former Skangas) and the vessel mainly operates in the North Sea and the Skagerrak area.

Skangas celebrates milestone with 1,000 LNG bunkering operations in 2017

Tue Mar 20 10:58:37 CET 2018 arnekiel

Skangas has announced that it completed 1,000 liquid natural gas (LNG) bunkering operations in 2017, representing more than 60% increase over previous years. According to Skangas, the driving force behind this rise rests in supply to new vessels both in regular routes and in tramp/spot market. The market has been waiting for the LNG bunkering vessels, which is the practice of delivering LNG to ships to use as fuel for their own consumption. “As more and more operators convert their ships to clean fuel with LNG and dual-fuelled engines to power them, demand has risen significantly,” said Gunnar Helmen, Sales Manager - Marine for Skangas. “This is particularly true in European waters where, until recently, most of the traffic consisted of ferries and RoPax cruise ferries routinely traveling set routes. Today, the supply pattern is more diverse due to the use of a greater variety of vessels, that require different types of bunkering solutions. And we are responding directly by offering a number of solutions for this market.” LNG is the cleanest available marine fuel; one that is rapidly becoming more commonly used as a cost-effective alternative. LNG is suitable for all vessel types, including ferries, passenger ships, tankers, bulk, supply and containerships. LNG offers several benefits by reducing local and global pollution. Switching to LNG completely removes SOx and particulates, and reduces NOx emissions by up to 85%. In addition, LNG reduces CO2 emissions by at least 20%. Use of LNG as marine fuel result in compliance with current and forthcoming IMO and EU regulations. Anticipating the marine market’s desire to convert to cleaner fuels, Skangas has made a concerted effort to make LNG more accessible. In addition to expanding infrastructure and improving bunkering techniques, the company put its new customized bunker-feeder vessel Coralius into operation in 2017, ushering in a new era of efficiency in LNG bunkering. The Coralius, which delivers LNG through ship-to-ship bunkering at sea, has improved the company’s ability to be more flexible and responsive to vessels that require LNG without visiting a terminal or port. Ship-to-ship bunkering is just one of the ways that Skangas supplies LNG. Vessels also easily access LNG directly from the Skangas network of terminals, its production facility near Stavanger, and via truck-to-ship bunkering at seaports throughout the Nordics.

Skangas' Coralius carries out combined cooldown and LNG fuel operation in open sea

Mon Oct 16 22:51:48 CEST 2017 arnekiel

For the first time Skangas’ vessel Coralius both cooled down tanks and delivered liquefied natural gas (LNG) in one operation. The receiving vessel LEG/C Navigator Aurora was supplied with just under 500 mt LNG in the middle of a voyage between Sweden and South Europe. The complete operation took place at Danafjord outside Gothenburg over 7th and 8th of October 2017 and the operation was considered a great success, Skangas said in a press release.

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Daily average speed

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Distance travelled

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Ship master data